Posts Categorized: Networks, Mentors and Career

Actionable Tips to Grow Your Networks

“It’s not what you know, but whom you know,” is a phrase with which many of us are familiar, and in today’s hyper-connected world it’s truer than ever. The power of one’s network can’t be diminished, an essential part of professional life that can further your career like nothing else. The right network can solve…read more

Can You Meet For a Cup of Coffee?

Ever get that call from a former colleague or someone you recently met at a conference asking for that “cup of coffee?” It is typically a code name for a job search, and I believe we should all be saying yes and be willing to support others in their quest.

But this post is not speaking to those of us taking the call – it is speaking to the caller.

Approaching a Job Search after a Termination or Layoff

It’s usually easy to spot: the nervous jitters as he talks about his most recent position, the disdain he is clearly trying to hide about his supervisor or colleagues, the glossing over of the actual job conclusion. By the time I ask, “ so what prompted you to leave” or “what brings you in today,” I can almost recite the words that always include “laid-off”, “let go”, “downsizing”, “bad manager”, etc. As a career coach, I encounter a myriad of clients who have a gap in their employment history. Typically these clients address this issue with me in one of two ways. They either shy away from the topic (think example above) to avoid mentioning it until half way through the appointment, after the resume review, or they bring it up immediately and we spend the better part of an hour talking about this event that has defined them for the past several months of the job search.

Compassion and the HR Professional

It happens to all of us in HR at some point in our lives. We find ourselves caught in an awkward position at work and we ask ourselves, “What is the best response here?”

I am talking about situations where compassion is needed, but with extenuating circumstances. You’ve encountered the scenario before. An employee confides something deeply personal…

{Career Transition} Get Your Story Straight

Students and clients come in and out of my office with the common agenda: the intent to talk about career transition. These transition goals can take many shapes, such as moving from a generalist role to an analyst role, moving from a specialist to a manager, and often segueing out of one function and into another (think finance to marketing).

Regardless of the type of change they are looking to make, my advice is always the same: Get Your Story Straight.

Resolve to Quit Sabotaging Your Success

I was chatting with a colleague over coffee discussing how stressful 2012 was. We chatted about the targets we missed, the challenges we faced, and we went on and on with an amazing crystal clear memory of everything we knew we could have done better. We suddenly stopped and gazed astonishingly at each other. Just the day before, both of us were awarded by the CEO for our achievements in 2012. And here we are, than 24 hours later, sounding like total quitters instead of behaving as winners. When did we learn to become so harsh on ourselves and why do we do we do that to ourselves?

{Women of HR Unwrapped} Fear Can Help You Grow

We are unwrapping some posts from the Women of HR archives for you this holiday season. Relax, enjoy and let us know if there is a favorite of yours you’d like to see unwrapped and run again.

The Dressing Game: How to Dress For Success

Power dressing can never be understated in the corporate world and we all know that. Coined in the latter part of the 1970, the term “power dressing” has been the dressing style of those wanting to reflect a professional image, an elite status, influence and authority. The impact of looking important on one’s career progression became a factor not to ignore by both men and women.

Skip the Clichés in Your Job Search

It’s common sense (well it should be anyway!) that job seekers shouldn’t bad mouth former employers on a job interview. However, when you’re looking for a new job, there’s always a good reason for it and you should be honest — in a professional way. Unless the person interviewing you has just fallen off of a turnip truck or is on their first day of the job, they’ll want to know more. It’s best if it comes from you rather than having the interviewer make an incorrect assumption about you or your work.

Handling Gaps in Your Resume

In the world of job seeking and resume writing, gaps in your employment history can make recruiters question you several times and think many times over before offering you a job. Everyone is aware of this and employment gaps are big stress factors for job seekers today. Such gaps can surface no matter how hard you work, how responsible you are, or how diligently you plan your life. The key to overcoming such gaps is to not let it hurt you when you are searching for a job. Remember that being out of work for a period of time does not mean you cannot keep yourself busy.