Posts Tagged: change

CEO for a Day: Listen, Take Note and Act

Women of HR were asked, “If you were CEO for a day, what would (or did) you focus on to improve an organization’s productivity, employee engagement or ability to recruit?” This is the fourth post in the series of responses.

Do you remember when you were a kid and played a game with friends, asking each other: what would you change if you suddenly, magically became the President? As I recall, our responses ran along the lines of: outlaw homework. Buy every homeless person a house. Give every kid a bike or a pony, whichever they prefer. Pass a law that dessert comes first. Ship all our extra food to poor people in Africa.

I fondly remember those sweet, innocent answers as I accept the challenge to write about being CEO for a day.

The Brutal World of Organization

I swear I’ve spent the last four, almost five, years trying to figure out how to keep myself organized. It’s a crazy, moving world we live in where things are constantly changing and it’s hard to keep and stay on top of things. I found the perfect notebook where I keep my to-do lists. It has a calendar on the bottom of each page AND there’s even a fancy spot for “hot items.” No matter the job we work in – HR or not, we all have to stay organized. And dorkily (yes, I know that is not a word) enough I am really curious what you all do to stay organized.

Do You Control Your Change?

We see change everywhere. We have experts on change management and we tell leaders and employees to embrace change. It’s BS. Yes, it really is. Not that change doesn’t build character – it certainly does! But it’s easy to be passionate about the value of change when it’s our idea, our choice.

Be a Change Manager

In the world we live in, change is inevitable and, as HR professionals, we are constantly dealing with it and the effects on our workforce. In my experience I find that people have the same reaction whether the change is positive or negative. More often than not conclusions are formed, rumors are spread and morale takes a hit.

The next time you find yourself communicating change in the workplace, take the following into consideration to ensure transitions go as smoothly as possible.

Break Free From Inflexible Thinking

As an HR professional, I understand that there needs to be certain rules and guidelines in place; rules to ensure a safe, legal, and productive environment for our employees. But when we spend too much time focused on those rules and who might break them, we lose sight of what our true purpose should be: providing the support to perpetuate the success of our organizations through our people.

Change Your Story to Excel in Office Politics

You can be authentic and sincere and succeed at office politics. Office politics won’t go away just because you ignore them. Just change the name of the game so you can win – or at least have more fun trying!

Real Success Requires Honesty

I believe real success comes to those who are able to see their shortcomings and their strengths and play to both of these accordingly. It requires an unparalleled level of honesty but the reward is a life that’s far more satisfying and truer to oneself.I am reminded of the many beautiful aspects of womanhood, of the very elements that make us who we are.

Be The Captain of Your Own Ship

As a gay man, I am often confused by the notion of striving for equal rights. It is not the equal part that is confusing. It is the striving.

On one hand, there is a need to identify with a cultural brand, e.g. gay. On the other hand, there is a quest for rights that everyone else has. With that, is also a quest for opportunities, and the subsequent success and power that others possess. Each of us decides our own definition of success and power. Take charge of yourself, create your own definitions of success and power, and be the captain of your own ship.

Let Others Take Responsibility for Their Own Mistakes

The fact is, women apologize far more often than men. And we apologize for different reasons, often to convey sympathy rather than responsibility. Care less. Apologize less. Or at least count the number of times you say, “I’m sorry,” compared to your male peers. Let people take responsibilities for their own mistakes. It won’t kill them.