Tag: culture

Employee Recognition and Discipline: The Keys to Creating and Protecting Your Corporate Culture

Posted on June 12th, by a Guest Contributor in Business and Workplace. 4 comments

What is a great corporate culture? Among other things, it’s that intangible something that motivates and inspires employees to do their best work, whether they are under the watchful eyes of management or not. But a great corporate culture doesn’t happen overnight. It must be consciously cultivated and constantly protected as one of the company’s greatest assets. After all, that culture—that unique “collective corporate environment”—is what drives productivity and sets an organization apart from its competitors. Being that creating a healthy corporate culture is essential for all businesses, here’s a look at two key factors—Employee Recognition and Discipline—and the importance of each in creating and protecting your corporate culture.

 

Employee Recognition

In many ways you could call employee recognition a culture within itself. After all, what better way to recruit and retain top talent than by being recognized as a company that knows how to recognize and appreciate its employees? It’s no wonder that employee recognition programs are becoming more prominent among small and large organizations, as they can help businesses create and protect a positive corporate culture by…

 

Creating an atmosphere of trust and respect

Proper recognition helps create an environment where employees are encouraged to openly share ideas and opinions because they feel that what they have to say is important to the company and appreciated by management. Good managers understand that recognition isn’t always about the pat on the back or some tangible reward. True recognition is more about employees being able to actively contribute in an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect, without fear of reproach or being shot down.

 

Fueling employee engagement

It’s no secret that engaged employees are happier employees. Recognition programs can help to fuel greater employee engagement by appropriately recognizing individual achievements, at the same time encouraging more of the same. The most effective rewards are specific to the task that has been accomplished. They are also all-inclusive, being distributed across all levels of the organization so every employee feels that they have a fair chance of receiving recognition. Rewards should also be delivered quickly with respect to the task or behavior that is being recognized. And finally, the more meaningful and relevant the reward is, the more it will fuel a corporate culture of happy and engaged employees.

 

Reinforcing positive behaviors throughout the entire organization

A corporate culture has the power to influence every aspect of an organization for good or bad. Employee recognition and rewards programs help to promote a positive culture by reinforcing positive behaviors throughout the entire organization. This is especially true of “strategic” employee recognition, which can spur innovation by encouraging employees to repeat desired behaviors over and over.

 
Discipline

Unlike the word implies, discipline, with respect to building and protecting a corporate culture is not about implementing and enforcing a cold harsh set of rules. Discipline is about creating the desired climate from the top down. It’s about management teams that are committed to:

 

Set and communicate clear goals

Employees respond well to management that clearly communicates corporate goals and expectations. Clear goals help employees recognize the specific roles they play in helping the company accomplish its objectives. In addition, clear and realistic goals, along with suitable recognition for achieving those goals, challenges and motivates employees to do their best work, which is what a great corporate culture is all about.

 

Model the desired culture

Think of a business with a great culture and you can be sure that the desired corporate values and expectations are modeled from top leadership on down. Practicing what is preached allows management to effectively discuss corporate values, principals and behavioral expectations with employees in an open and positive atmosphere. Plus, leading by example sets a true standard that employees will more willingly try to emulate.

 

Take action

Even the most motivated employees need managers to lead them to act. And they tend to respond best to managers who hold themselves to the same standards of excellence, responsibility and accountability that they ask of employees. Especially those leaders that actively and effectively recognize and reward employee accomplishments. This type of leadership is essential for cultivating and protecting a positive corporate culture.

 

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About the Author:  Robert Cordray is a freelance writer and expert in business and finance. He has received many accolades for his work in teaching solid entrepreneur advice.


Three Things Employees Need

Posted on March 6th, by Judith Lindenberger in Business and Workplace. 9 comments

Three things needed for a long term relationship are commitment, caring and communication. Just as partners in a successful marriage, who are committed to one another, understand the benefits they receive from one another, employees and employers require the same. Employees need to achieve results and employers to provide stability.

Caring is not a word used often in employment agreements but love has a place in the corporate world. The best employers treat their employees well by providing competitive salaries and benefits, training supervisors to manage effectively, giving employees the tools that they need to do their jobs, and, most important, letting employees know how they are doing. Employees show that love back by being passionate about quality and loyal to the companies for whom they work.

And then there is communication. In order to sustain a long term and healthy relationship with employees, smart companies provide job descriptions, mission statements, vision, goals, and frequent performance feedback. And smart employees, who understand where the company is headed and what they need to do, offer innovation.

Just like a successful marriage takes work, the relationship between employers and employees requires the same commitment, caring and communication, not just offered once, but provided continuously over the long term.

 

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About the author: Judy Lindenberger is the President of The Lindenberger Group, an award-winning human resources consulting firm, located near Princeton, NJ. They are experts in career coaching, customized training workshops, online training programs, mentoring, 360-degree assessment and feedback, HR audits, employee handbooks, and more. Learn more about them at www.lindenbergergroup.com.


Get in the Groove of Giving Back

Posted on December 19th, by a Guest Contributor in Business and Workplace. 1 Comment

The fundamental idea of ‘giving’ is nothing new to women (women give birth, produce life-giving milk, etc.) but ‘giving’ as a professional philosophy is a path far too often looked upon as sacrificial or inferior by its very nature. After all, for every giver there must necessarily be a taker.

Think about it: Companies don’t want to ‘give’ away their edge in the market or secrets to the competition; if you ‘give’ credit to someone else, you may forfeit your own best interests. And then there’s the ultimate professional ‘no-no’ of ‘giving’ up and letting sales or clients walk out the door.

In all of these scenarios, giving has a negative connotation and no one wants to be on the short end of that stick, least of all women, who still routinely feel the need to work harder and be tougher than men just to be viewed as equals.

But what if cultivating a spirit of giving in the workplace could be just the thing your company needs to get ahead, both professionally and individually?

And consider the possibilities if women were to give from a place of strength rather than from a place of weakness or fear. Next stop: World domination!

But seriously, cultivating a corporate spirit of giving has many far-reaching benefits, and they don’t stop with the people within our professional spheres – they are simply where it starts. And you can be the catalyst to bring about your workplace’s emphasis on internal and external acts of altruism.

For more specifics on why getting in the grove of giving back is good for business, consider the following:

 

Giving Can Help you feel like a Natural Woman

recent study presented in the Wall Street Journal indicates that humans are hard-wired for giving.

The study tested the brain’s responses to giving and the surprising results revealed that when people give to charity or extend aid to others, they stimulate a pleasure-sensing portion of the brain. In essence, giving to charity is neurologically similar to ingesting an addictive drug or learning you’ve hit the jackpot. Basically, giving back feels good!

As an added element to the test, subjects were presented with both voluntary and involuntary giving. For example, there were some instances wherein people could choose to give to charity and it was completely of their own free will to do so. Other times, the computer would simply inform them that they were required to give (similar to taxation).

Perhaps not so surprisingly, people responded more positively to the occasions where they were in control of their actions. Although the brain still registered good vibes when the people were forced to give, they were not nearly as strong as when the subjects gave on their own.

In terms of what this means for you and developing your own corporate spirit of giving, make giving voluntary and then lead by example. You’ll find that when you do what you’re naturally inclined to do, you can get back to feeling more like a natural woman!

 

Giving is Beneficial to your Corporate Bottom Line

When you encourage employees and co-workers to help each other, they can not only feel better about themselves but they can also boost business.

For one thing, the idea that two heads are better than one, three are better than two, and so on becomes front and center for creating synergy within your teams. And when it ceases to be a competition and instead becomes a common goal, great things can happen!

At the same time, communities want to support companies who are about more than themselves. By implementing a philosophy of giving back every day, you can expand your professional impact and your client base at the same time.

What are some of the other benefits women can experience by fostering a culture of corporate giving?

 

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About the Author: Myrna Vaca is the Head of Marketing and Communications at Lyoness America, where she is responsible for marketing, communication and business development efforts. The Lyoness Child & Family Foundation (CFF) is actively involved in supporting children, adolescents and families worldwide, especially in the field of education. Check out Lyoness on Twitter.


A Healthy & Humorous Workplace Boosts Business Performance

Posted on December 10th, by a Guest Contributor in Business and Workplace. No Comments

Healthy employees make for a healthy bottom line. The mental and physical health of your employees has a direct effect on your business’ performance. To emphasize this synergy, the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine looked at health-focused companies that won its Health Achievement Award and found they consistently outperformed the
Standard & Poor’s 500 index between 1999 and 2012. Companies that emphasize a healthy work culture are more valuable to investors and remarkably impact business performance.

Laughter: An Important Ingredient in a Healthy Workplace

Sure, businesses offer company-sponsored health programs, and the typical ambitious businessperson participates in them. Yet among yoga practice and running, laughter in the workplace can also improve health. Laughter has numerous health benefits—it lowers blood pressure, reduces stress hormone levels, improves cardiac health and releases endorphins, according to Gaiam Life. Laughter is a healthy high that creates a productive and more engaged working environment.

“Health, happiness and productivity are intrinsically linked,” Josh Stevens told FoxBusiness.com. As CEO of Keas, a workplace health and wellness program, Stevens believes poor health directly affects employee disengagement, lost productivity and low job satisfaction. Employers can use humor as a cost-effective tool that improves an employee’s mental and physical health for enhanced productivity. Humor can release tension and reduce boredom for tedious and repetitive work. A hearty laugh can lower anxiety and stress, which helps an employee concentrate and focus on high-pressure projects.

Embrace a laid-back, relaxing (and productive) work environment where employees can naturally be themselves and make jokes. In an Australian study of 2,500 employees, 81 percent of the surveyed employees believe a fun working environment correlates to more productivity, and 93 percent said on-the-job laughing lowers work-related stress, according to the essay “Humor in the Workplace: Anecdotal Evidence Suggests Connection to Employee Performance.” A Robert Half International survey supports the humor and productivity relationship—84 percent of surveyed execs believe people who have a good sense of humor do better on the job.

Humor connects employees and boosts employee team-building, which creates an open, expressive and trusting work environment. If employees can bond over a silly joke and share a laugh, then those same employees are likely to positively collaborate on ideas and work well together on a project to achieve a common goal.

Get Merrier This Holiday Season

Welcome humor into the workplace by creating a non-hierarchical, innovative office culture that encourages employees to comfortably be who they are (within common-sense, professional limitations, of course). As the end of 2013 approaches, here are some fun holiday-themed events you can use to keep up employee momentum and motivation:

  • Invite co-workers to happy hour
  • Host a funny family photo contest. Invite employees to submit their silliest Christmas card photos and then create a presentation for the company. Ask employees to vote for their favorite and award first, second and third place winners with a PTO day or gift card.
  • Throw an office party and welcome employees’ partners and kids—you can even have Santa on hand.

Use the holidays as an easy transition into a more laid-back workplace that encourages employee humor (and higher performance) for 2014.

 

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About the Author: Henry Griffith is a life coach for personal and professional needs. He works closely with several health and wellness organizations to promote healthy living in the workplace and at home. He has given multiple motivational speeches to public and private organizations. Now that he has small children of his own, he is taking time to write, travel with his kids and work on a book about healthy family living.


Corporate Culture Training – “How To”

Posted on August 20th, by a Guest Contributor in Business and Workplace. No Comments

Corporate culture is the heartbeat of every good company, helping it to run smoothly and bringing the organization to life.  It is essential for all employees in a corporate environment to not only understand the workload expectations, but the company culture as well.  Here are some “how to” tips on corporate culture training to better communicate company values, visions, and strategic priorities.

  • Schedule corporate culture training as a required professional development program for all different teams and positions throughout the company.  This will allow individuals to be on the same page and help instill the culture throughout all teams.

 

  • Rather than having the Human Resources department present the culture training, have professionals from Operations and Senior Executives who do not report directly to the CEO present the material.  This will help to keep the focus on work-based cultural scenarios Also, do not discriminate when selecting individuals to lead the cultural training.  Rather than prioritizing minorities or women to be engaged or act as group leaders, have a good blend of all different individuals that represent your company.

 

  • Stress the importance of culture training, yet recognize that it is a piece to the larger whole in driving the organization’s values and mission to eventually lead to success.

 

  • When talking about improvements that need to be made, start from the top of the company and work down.  Following this path will help to engage even the lowest employee and not make them feel as though all the responsibility is on them.

 

  • Do not think that culture training will correct discriminatory behaviors or discouraged practices in the work place.  See this environment as a place to help prevent future unprofessional behaviors and teach employees what is expected of them before problems arise.

 

  • Finally, do not solely evaluate how impactful the training is through responses provided by participants or facilitators.  Wait to see if there is improvement or change in the workplace by monitoring the environment and look for key distinguishing factors that were discussed at the training.  Also, make sure that follow-up is provided to reinforce the content, and hold individuals accountable for the new policies and practices taught.

 

It is essential to know that all employees are fully aware of the corporate culture and what is expected of them. Providing a training session that goes over this topic is a great way to engage employees and present the materials and expectations before problems arise.

 

This post was contributed by Kelsey Grabarek on behalf of Dale Carnegie Training, the training company founded on the principles of the famous speaker and author of “How to Win Friends and Influence People.”  Visit Dale Carnegie Training online to learn more about leadership training.

 

Photo credit iStockphoto


4 Ways Consumer Behavior Shapes the Workplace

Posted on April 30th, by Jennifer Miller in Business and Workplace. 2 comments

The other day I happened upon the Fast Company article 12 Trends That Will Rule Products In 2013. The article was focused on consumer goods like phones and washing machines, but you know what? The trends listed made sense in the context of the workplace too and here’s why: your employees are consumers. It’s inevitable that their consumer purchasing behavior will shape their attitudes at work as well.

Here are four trends Fast Company listed that have implications for those of us in the human resources and management functions of our companies. These trends are driving employee expectations; a wise organizational leader pays attention to these inclinations and responds accordingly.

Customer-facing employees are your brain and your backbone.  The article states,The crucial element in any customer experience is still people, no matter how much technology has transformed the landscape.” Do not be seduced by what your company’s latest technology can do. The “gee whiz!” factor gets old fast – for both employees and your organization’s external customers.

Worth is determined by philosophy, not price. Can you say “intense, endless salary negotiations?”  The Fast Company authors ask,How do you determine a product’s intrinsic worth?” They say that rather than focusing on price, focus on alignment in values. Seems like a no-brainer, right? Then why is it that when the “product” is a talented job candidate, we often get mired in “nickel-and-diming” during the negotiation process? Either an employee will bring a talent set and corresponding values alignment, or s/he won’t. Are you willing to pay for that? If not, quit wasting your time and theirs.

Narrative is a delivery vehicle to make information stick. The Heath brothers made this point with Made to Stick many years ago, but it bears repeating, because, some of us still haven’t figured it out. For example, company policies and procedures are D.U.L.L. but they’re important to efficient business operation. Where’s the “story” behind why you must implement the new policy? If there’s no compelling narrative, maybe you don’t need that policy after all.

Human interaction has never been more precious. “Look for places to act more human.” We’re all fatigued with automated everything. Sure, we love the convenience, but sometimes we just crave an interactive experience with a real person. Like the Discover TV ad that features a customer who is surprised when an actual human answers her call, as leaders and HR managers, we must remember to value the power of a conversation.

Everyone is a specialist. The other day a colleague told me that they were consolidating job functions in the sales division; their sales reps would move from selling three lines of very complex business to eight. That’s insanity. The Fast Company article states “trying to be everything to everyone is a losing proposition.” I agree. People love to “show what they know” and that’s pretty tough when they must “know” everything.

Taking a seemingly unrelated topic like consumer behavior and applying it to workplace issues can help offer insights we might otherwise overlook. As leaders in our respective functions we can glean new insights on bringing out the best in our employees with a slight tweak in perspective.

What say you? How do you see consumer behavior outside the office influencing the way employees act in the workplace?

About the author: For 20+ years, Jennifer V. Miller has been helping professionals “master the people equation” to maximize their personal influence. A former HR generalist and training manager, she now advises executives on how to create positive, productive workplace environments. She is the founder and Managing Partner of SkillSource and blogs at The People Equation. You can connect with Jennifer on Twitter as @JenniferVMiller.

Image credit: leolintang / 123RF Stock Photo

 


Making Personal Development a Part of Your Culture

Posted on April 2nd, by Amanda Andrade in Business and Workplace. 1 Comment

Personal development is incredibly important for both employees and employers, yet few take it as seriously as they should. However, by making personal development a part of your office culture, you can create a company staffed with a well-trained, knowledgeable workforce eager to further their career with you. To help you increase your employees’ interest in personal development, consider the following:

Get Involved

One of the best ways for you to get employees interest in training or making personal development a part of your company culture is by taking your own personal development seriously. Attend trainings yourself, and be actively involved in finding your own development events and helping those around you find trainings beneficial to them. Another great way is by acknowledging that others are taking their personal development seriously. Thank employees for attending trainings or point out their accomplishment during the next staff meeting.

Promote Opportunities

While it may seem like a no-brainer, many employers and managers actually overlook marketing their own training opportunities. Don’t just post a flyer on the community board briefly listing any training opportunities. Be sure to send out emails, let employees know about such opportunities during meetings, and also be sure to pull employees aside that you believe would most benefit from such trainings and give them a heads up. The more aware employees are of the trainings available to them, they more inclined they will be to attend them.

Create Cross-Training

Cross-trainings are not only good for your employees, but they are good for your business too. When you have employees that can competently perform other jobs within your business, it makes promoting from within easier, and also makes the need to temp staff during an absence unnecessary. Offer opportunities for cross-trainings in both inter- and intra-department settings so that employees truly feel like they have the ability to move both laterally and upwards in your company.

Keep Opportunities Available

Trainings don’t have to only be off-site or on the employee’s personal time. Remember that while the training may be benefiting your employees professionally, in doing so it is also benefitting the productivity of your company. So provide learning opportunities throughout the office and do so on a regular basis. Create a multimedia library with relevant CDs, DVDs, and workbooks; offer in-office trainings that employees can attend on company time; and bring in guest speakers during lunch hours that employees can glean information from. The more accessible training is the more inclined your employees with be to take advantage of it.

Take Development Seriously

Many employees don’t take advantage of personal development because they often don’t know where to begin. To help employees focus on their strengths and weaknesses and how they can improve upon them, turn regular reviews into development sessions. Don’t just tell them where they can improve. Ask employees to pick out areas in which they would like to improve, and then coach them how to get there. Become a mentor to your employees or find another employee that would be better suited to do so. Also be sure to set timelines together so that employees understand that you take their development seriously.

If you want a motivated and loyal workforce, you need to make it obvious that you are interested and invested in their personal development. Provide them with frequent and adequate opportunities, demonstrate your own eagerness to improve yourself, and offer extra support where needed. Most people are eager to better themselves, especially professionally, but often get overwhelmed and don’t know where to begin. Take the time to develop your staff, and they will be more inclined to work harder and longer for you – which will ultimately, make your company more profitable. It’s a win-win for everyone.

About the author: Amanda Andrade, SPHR, CCP, GRP  is the Chief People Officer for Veterans United Home Loans – Fortune magazine’s 21st best medium workplace and one the fastest growing companies in the United States according to INC magazine. Amanda has led human resource organizations in both public and private sectors, serving employees in diverse work settings, focusing on environment and behavior in the workplace. Connect with Amanda on Google+.

Photo credit: iStockPhoto


I've Got the Music in Me!

Posted on February 14th, by Steve Browne in Community and Connection. Comments Off

There are some things in life that truly tie us all together. I think that one of them is music!! Seriously, think about it.

We can remember a certain song or group that defined high school, college, weddings, etc.  I distinctly remember the rush of emotion I would get when the High School pep band would play “Jet” by Paul McCartney & Wings during the warm up. Geeked !!

Music follows all people and when you look at that in the context of HR, there is a gold mine of tunes that resonate with all of us.  Paul Smith, author of Welcome to the Occupation, gathered some great lists of HR/work related songs that we can all see ourselves in. Check out his post here: Songs About Work 3-D.

Along those lines and to get you hooked, I want you to try these:

THE song when you're thinking about the potential termination of a team member from The Clash!!

Or, when you've had one of those days that seem to drone on and on, there's the new wave classic by Trio – “Da Da Da”

My “go to” song lately has been what I see happening to employees as they come to work each week - “I Don't Like Mondays” by the Boomtown Rats.

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Those are just a few that hit me and you can probably guess what type of music I tend to listen to. What does that say about me?  That's up to your interpretation. The thing to remember in this is that the great people around you everyday have music in them too!!  They are full of different styles, genres, and themes that get them through each day.

Too often in HR we want everyone to “be on the same page” which really means that we want people to conform to a certain direction or movement.  We often aren't looking for their input. We just want them to get in line with everyone else. Wouldn't it be better if we let them express themselves and bring their ideas, approaches and insight to situations?  It doesn't mean that we won't reach consensus or agreement.

In fact, it's just the opposite.  By involving the diverse reality of employees around us, we come up with better conclusions and strategies.

So, this week, let your music flow!! Let others see the great tunes you love and take in the symphony of those around you. You'll love the mix that comes from it!!

Remember, You've Got the Music in YOU !!

About the author: Steve Browne is the ultimate connector and social media guidance counselor and also works in the trenches of Human Resources. Steve is the Executive Director of HR for LaRosa’s. He has responsibilities for the strategic direction of over 1400 employees. In his spare time, he is active in Ohio SHRM and runs a subscriber-based newsletter called HR Net. Connect with Steve on Twitter as @sbrownehr and on LinkedIn.

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Why Your Company Should Use Social Media

Posted on October 23rd, by a Guest Contributor in Business and Workplace. 4 comments

What was once a professional networking tool used by a select few has now become a critical aspect of the lives of a huge portion of the population. Social media can be a powerful resource for businesses wanting to expand, diversify, or appeal to a wider demographic.

This starts with the simple concept of branding. Branding is more than choosing a name for your company and defining a business plan. You must create an impression that will last with your targeted audience. WordPress themes, for example, allow you to develop a website and blog that are geared toward your market and feature a branded appearance and “feel” that you can carry through your social media to establish recognition and continuity.

There are several ways in which you can improve your business through the use of social media:

Recognition as a Resource in Your Niche

If you are seen by your readers as a resource for valuable information related to your niche you will develop the reputation of being a reliable, established voice that your audience will trust and come to for information, products and services.

Social media allows you to provide information not just on your individual company, but on the actual market in which your company is involved. This will bring those with questions to you and keep them coming back to learn more. Once you are trusted even by a few, this opinion will spread.

Visibility

If no one knows that you exist, how can you expect to build a customer base? Involvement in social media puts you right in front of the tremendous audience that uses social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, and Foursquare on a daily basis. Social media gives you the opportunity to be involved in the daily thoughts and activities of your targeted audience through creating and participating in conversations, offering useful or interesting tidbits of information, and inviting potential customers to interact with you on your social media platform and through your other forms of internet presence.

Find New Leads and Opportunities for Expansion

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Being involved in social media allows you to seek out new leads, clients, and ways to expand the scope of your business. With a social media presence you can attract clients and referrals or determine if there are needs in your market that you could fulfill through new projects. Linking your social media platforms and other forms of internet presence such as blogs and websites will develop your identity as a frontrunner in your market and encourage people to refer friends, suggest new projects, and look to you for opportunity.

Company Culture

Your company culture is important to the success of your business because it is what will make you stand out. When your customers recognize your brand, what impression do you want it to make? Developing a social media strategy will force you to focus in on what makes you you. You must create your company personality and identity in order for you to maintain your social media involvement so that your participation on these platforms is optimized to appeal to your targeted audience.

Improved Hiring Abilities

Your company is really only as good as the people that comprise your team so you should devote attention to selecting candidates that will make a beneficial contribution to your company. Social media involvement reduces the need to sift through endless piles of resumes and generic cover letters by letting you focus only on those people that are involved in your network.

Involvement will show that they are fully aware of your company and can demonstrate their compatibility with your company culture. Social media is a prime illuminator of personality, giving you the opportunity to pinpoint those candidates you feel would be a good match so you can shorten the hiring process and improve your chances of building a strong, valuable team without need for adjustments later.

Photo credit: norebbo.com

About author

Olga Ionel is a creative writer at ThemeFuse.com. She is passionate by WordPress, SEO and Blogging.

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CEO for a Day: Thoughtful Business Leadership

Posted on September 19th, by Nisha Raghavan in Women of HR Series: CEO For A Day. 1 Comment
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Women of  HR were asked, “If you were CEO for a day, what would (or did) you focus on to improve an organization's productivity, employee engagement or ability to recruit?”  This is the fifth post in the series of responses.

“Wow! It is really fascinating to hear people call me a CEO of my company even if it is for a day! Let me make this a 12 hour work day for myself. I am getting one shot at this and I need to maximize my work day to make a few hard decisions and to inspire everyone in communicating why we do things the way we do!”

So, how would it be if I, an HR professional, were CEO for a day?  When Lisa asked me, my mind pondered a lot of questions. What is the culture of my organization? What are the values and behavior I want to instill? What kind of behavior do I want to see rewarded? Am I rewarding and engaging the right employees so that they will continue to stay with us?

Eliminate Toxic Managers

All these questions directed me to first study my current manpower. Do I have the right people in place to do their job and help others get their jobs done? Are they engaged?

Before investing on engagement I need to know if I can rely on my employees at least for the near future. I don't want to see someone quitting the  day after receiving training, monetary or other rewards. I have seen employees wait to get their pay raise or incentive only to quit and join some other organization – timing their departure to their advantage.

Having said that, I am going to rely on my experience and my HR eyeglasses to create a list of toxic managers. These are the managers who mess up the organization’s culture and values and make a bad impact on employees. So, let me just flush them out before it hurts the immune system of the organization.

Hire for Culture

To replace toxic managers and get the right people in leadership roles, I will consider the opinions of peer leaders. The people I would consider are those who consistently deliver outstanding results, are willing leaders and have the right attitude. And I would be reviewing all new pending hires before any offers are made.

This will make sure that we hire for our culture.

Lead

Although recruitment and employment engagement is an ongoing process, I do feel having been given only a day as CEO, it's necessary and critical that I gain the confidence of my employees in me. I will target a few things on this day:

  • Instill our Culture. I will create a value-based culture in which employees are be truste
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    d to do the right things because they know what the organization stands for and believes in it. To strengthen this trust in our culture I would stretch myself to all employees by making myself accessible at every level. I am going to draw inspiration from speaker, writer and visionary Simon Sinek, who says, “Trust doesn't come from making the right decision. Trust comes from giving people an honest assessment for why the decision was made.”

  • Walk the Talk. As CEO, I am actually one among  our employees so I will emulate the behavior that I want to see from them. I will not over promise and under-deliver because that can poison the work culture I want to instill. And I will not put up with someone else doing that. I want people to inspire and to be inspired.
  • Reward Results. I will make it obvious to everyone what good performance means. Everyone needs to understand their commitment to execution which will in turn open up opportunities for growth. I will ensure that there are career advancement opportunities within the organization for employees that will result from their effort and work.
  • Seek Feedback. I will provide a platform for every employee to open up andshare their views and suggestions with me. Their suggestions don’t have to be only about their immediate work or even about the organization. I want to get their best ideas about anything in life. This will get them to think creatively and one person’s ideas could be another person’s solution. Best suggestions will be awarded and implemented.

I know it is only a day that I can use this authority and hearing this, some of you might think that it is such a short notice and so I may not be able to implement all of these things. But my answer to this is if you are a thoughtful leader you can create a big impact on the people in less than a day. If  I create the foundation well then the rest will follow naturally.

Photo credit: iStock Photo

About the author: Nisha Raghavan is the author of Your HR Buddy blog. A former HR Generalist with extensive experience in Talent Management and Development, she specializes and writes about Employee Relations, Organization Development and how companies can keep their employees more engaged through Employee Engagement Initiatives. Her experience in the corporate world was as an HR Deputy Manager at Reliance Communications Limited, India.

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