Posts Tagged: women

I am Woman, See Me Work

Several weeks ago I sat next to a very nice older couple on a plane. I estimated their ages at as close to 80 which means they were probably born at some time in the 1930s and came of age in the 1950s. As I reviewed some work I had brought with me, this prompted the Mrs. to open up a fresh line of chit chat with me, as she, with a wide-eyed look on her face inquired,

“Do you work outside the home?”

I have to admit…I don’t think I’ve ever been asked that question in my life.

Communication for the Next Level

So often, when people vent their frustration about the boss, or the C-suite, I hear about how hard they work, how much they give, and how much they do not feel they are appreciated by those they work for. The gender factor accentuates it further because research confirms the male and female brains process what was said in emotionally different ways. If you want to deal with it, read on.

Why We Need Women of HR

What I like about Women of HR is that it’s a unique example of technology, community, and conversation. This site includes HR professionals who are at the beginning of their careers and seasoned HR veterans who are thinking about their second acts. There are women from the recruiting community speaking to women from the technology community. And there are women who love Human Resources and women who hate HR coming together in single space to advance the profession.

Women of HR’s Lilith Fair

It is incredibly cool to have a space where women (and men) celebrate our profession in a collaborative fashion, without it being all gooey.

That isn’t to say that women have experienced challenges in our profession, in fact we dominate the profession, but it is to say that we are at the stage where we can now influence our profession by celebrating who we really are. It is no longer about towing the company line. It is no longer about crafting a dated message. It is about putting a human touch on human resources.

Is There Really a Glass Ceiling?

Is there really a glass ceiling? I don’t buy it. But I could be wrong. I know there are more men in leadership positions than women. I know there are industries where men have the advantage. And I’ve worked with (and for) chauvinists. But I just don’t believe there is a conspiracy to keep women from advancing.

Perceptions of Ladies in High Heels

I love high heels. The exhilaration of rising from 5’3 to 5’7 in a quick step. The appearance of a much slimmer & perkier lower body. The click on concrete and office lobbies that commands attention. The toe cleavage. Yes…the toe cleavage.
I love high heels.

There Are No Rules to Getting Ahead

There are no rules to getting ahead. Those rules are a fallacy. There are barriers and there are difficulties, but just like there is no pixie dust that will make you successful, there are no rules that prevent you from doing good things that will make you successful.

Real Success Requires Honesty

I believe real success comes to those who are able to see their shortcomings and their strengths and play to both of these accordingly. It requires an unparalleled level of honesty but the reward is a life that’s far more satisfying and truer to oneself.I am reminded of the many beautiful aspects of womanhood, of the very elements that make us who we are.

Be The Captain of Your Own Ship

As a gay man, I am often confused by the notion of striving for equal rights. It is not the equal part that is confusing. It is the striving.

On one hand, there is a need to identify with a cultural brand, e.g. gay. On the other hand, there is a quest for rights that everyone else has. With that, is also a quest for opportunities, and the subsequent success and power that others possess. Each of us decides our own definition of success and power. Take charge of yourself, create your own definitions of success and power, and be the captain of your own ship.

Let Others Take Responsibility for Their Own Mistakes

The fact is, women apologize far more often than men. And we apologize for different reasons, often to convey sympathy rather than responsibility. Care less. Apologize less. Or at least count the number of times you say, “I’m sorry,” compared to your male peers. Let people take responsibilities for their own mistakes. It won’t kill them.