Posts Tagged: workplace

5 Ways to Be a Successful Businesswoman

Studies have shown that companies with diversity in their top teams produce improved financial results. Yet according to McKinsey, women hold less than 20% of the seats on corporate boards and executive committees in both the US and the UK and, from Forbes, only 4% of Fortune 500 company CEOs are female.So, how can we ‘sharpen our elbows’ and make it in a business world that for many still seems like an old boys’ network?

The Secret Formula for Employee Engagement

Remember when the exclamation “I’m engaged!” was almost always immediately followed by the question “when’s the wedding?” In today’s business environment, engagement takes on a whole new meaning, referring instead to how engaged, dedicated, and loyal employees are to their organization.

Engagement in the workplace may not be the same as a personal engagement between two people, but the key is that both are relationships, and relationships take work. Dedicating effort to understanding what engages your workers will allow you to create the most effective action plans to improve engagement. Don’t wait to engage your employees. Make the effort now.

The Value of Tactile Learning in the Workplace

There are countless articles out there focusing on the value of experiential learning for adults and the workplace. Tactile learning is of significant value to most adults and is a great form of experiential learning. My life revolves around a computer and it is an important part about how I interact in the working world, however I think my skills are better because there was a time when I had to figure things out without it. Our workforce has lost skills or capabilities because we discourage manual learning and miss out on great opportunities to more broadly apply what can arguably be a deeper skill set.

4 Tips for Curbing Gen Y Workplace Stereotypes

You’ve seen the generational labels. Generalizations lump everybody into one, big, homogenous group. The narrative on the Gen Y generation is filled with words like spoiled, entitled and demanding. Is it unfair? You bet it is. But here’s the deal – Millennials who point out the bias only reinforce the stereotype of spoiled, self-entitled whiners. In this post, I offer my career advice for Millennials.

Social Media and Sexual Harassment

Offices are a place of business… usually. The line between work and personal lives is being blurred as 9-to-5 jobs go out the window and professional and personal lives blend.

A direct comment that could be deemed sexual harassment is now an irregularity in physical places of business. Social media is a more subtle outlet for sexual harassment. With policies and procedures in place for more direct harassment, companies may be overlooking social media sexual harassment. Ensure every employee enjoys a harassment free work place by taking action now.

Leading Executive Conversations Part 2: Framing the Conversation

In my last blog post, Leading Executive Conversations: The Executive Perspective, I shared that leading an executive conversation should start by understanding their perspective on a particular subject. Now, we’re going to discuss framing the conversation.

Executives expect to hear three key things in a conversation. And I am going to tell you just what they are.

5 Networking Tips When You Don’t Have Time to Network

As a career coach working with MBA students who are looking to get connected in the business world, the most common question I encounter is about networking. In this tough economy many of students I work with are also juggling multiple roles such as full time professional, involved parent or caretaker. I often get an exasperated look when I bring up the importance of networking because the thought of adding another item to an already full to – do list is overwhelming. Here are some of the best, most applicable, tips on how to network with limited time.

HR, Try Treating Paid Employees like Volunteers

Feeling under appreciated is one of the most common reasons why people leave jobs. It can be really disheartening to work incredibly hard on something and feel as though no one even noticed. Employees that feel valued will work harder and stay with a company longer. Here are a few ways you can keep that from happening!

What did YOU do this Weekend?

Perhaps it’s a cliché because it’s true when we admonish people to “take time to smell the roses.” Why must we feel the need to be doing-something-every-minute? After a busy, hectic and structured work week filled with meetings, appointments, phone calls and tasks, isn’t it just enough to stop, relax and not feel the need to DO?

In our quest to appear busy and engaged and active and plugged-in we seem to have collectively embraced the viewpoint that just being in one place (i.e. HOME) for a span of time longer than it takes us to sleep and bathe is now seen as some sign of societal disengagement.

Silver HR

Two years ago, my oldest sister turned 50. I think I was more traumatized than she was. Since then, I’ve given a lot of reflection to growing older. My sister hitting that milestone first was actually a blessing because it affords me plenty of time to think about my life, my work and getting older. I have the luxury of time on my side as I adjust to the reality of reaching the half century mark myself.